Writing outside of NaNoWriMo.


IMG_3916 copy“From The Grasp Of Time.” is a novel I am writing now to the tune of 50,000 words minimum. It is a YA novel and frankly a very Catholic one. I will be aiming this one at religious publishing houses for YA books. Like in the vein of CS Lewis and JRR Tolkien. Others also have written in that vein so its not an unusual method. This is also not my first novel. I have one that being edited now that was written during the 2013 year. 2014 I decided not to write a new book, but work on the one I already had. I then shopped for an editor for it. I would have been done with it by now, but took a six month pause, while saving up for a new computer after my old one (and two others) were stolen from  our home the Morning of December 26, 2014. I was in agony while waiting and of myself writing by hand again. Something I used to figure it was waste of time and energy because I have to re-write thing to get them digitized. That when I realized I was mistaken. In many way, sketches by writing or drawing actually made the book better. I am after all an Visual Artist  Storyteller. Something that only typing the words out the first time, often misses things I see in my minds eye, but not always have the vocabulary ready to describe it.

Writing is a labor of love and occasional exasperation. It is also at times, an ego trip. I also find, I actually do more walking and exercise when I write regularly. If only because ones backside can only sit for a certain amount of time before feeling flees the flesh.

Heres to all in your writing adventures. Just make sure you take plenty of stops to stretch and drink healthy water to keep your inner ink fluid.

https://nancylouise2.files.wordpress.com/2015/11/img_3916-copy.jpg?w=300Catch you later writers!

Nancy Louise

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Slapping people is not nice!


First off, let’s us put up a small list of grievances I have received directed to my behavior. I who do my best to be a dear little angel who only blest. ( O.K. Friends of mine you can get off the ground and stop laughing now….)

1. I give my dog water to drink in a restaurant, from the same glass which will be washed will then be used by others…

He helps me so you don't have to...
He helps me so you don’t have to…

2. I am very insistent in getting answers to annoying questions people Try to evade me on…

image image

3. My acting cute and adorable gets on people’s nerves…

image

#3, you think I out grow this by now. After all I am over the age of five! But it works so well in getting me out of trouble! Humm maybe I need to get in less trouble and be more ‘old’? (Belch).

#2. Nope, not giving this one up, so knock that off your wish list for behaviors you wish I would change.

#1. This one, well it’s tough. I will make a point to bring HIS glass with me from now on. I was scolded in public recently for this by our waitress, after receiving a complaint seeing me give my dog water. She then informed me the glass had to now be destroyed so the customer would know it was not going back in with the others. When I protested that the glasses are washed, the waitresses said they could be sued for breech of hygiene. I became very quiet and compliant. And said I was quite sorry. Ironically, the number of things we can catch from a dog then washed glass is far less than we can from each other. But perception is often 90 percent of how the law is applied. So I will give him water from cups I bring in. The public perception of people with service dogs has been badly damaged by those who broke the law just to bring their pets in with them.

So I am going to put out a plea to all dog lovers, animal lovers etc. Next time you want to bring your pet into an establishment forbidding animals, DONT. PLEASE DONT. You will not only be hurting us, but yourselves as insensitive dog dolts dummies who bring their flea bags every where. Even when they are not. Those who have medical service animals, please keep up with their training. Not only for your own safety, but for others of us in your community.

That is my Christmas Wish for us all, that we get along, people and their loving dogs (or ponies, or felines, etc.).

Who Names The Moon. Chapter Two


Kalpana huddled in a corner of the transport, her hand firmly wrapped around Ticka’s paw.

“Ticka, what’s going to happen to us?”

“We are being sent to the city, to Paddy’s brother. What will happen after that I cannot be sure.”

“What about all the others? You think they got away?”

“Yes, I am sure many were able to escape. The scat cats were effective in getting the message out and releasing many of the animals from their cages. Most I am sure got away, others that could not be sold, others simply destroyed. You must not worry about them now. You must focus on your own survival.”

It was a hard reality, but Tikka was only capable of speaking the truth. Paddy, her beloved Paddy was dead. He’d gone without saying goodbye. She’d managed a kiss on his peaceful furry face before the transport soldiers had dragged them out of their home. Only Paddy’s designation of “semi-intelligent” had saved her from the indignity of being forced into a cage. Even so, she’d been shackled to the ship, unable to take move more than a few feet in any direction. Tikka and Ursa had suffered a similar fate.

Others were not as lucky. Friends from the village had also been corralled into the transport ship. She’d watched as too many familiar faces were designated as either livestock or meat stock, then locked up like animals for the remainder of the trip.

“I think I saw Sandy. They put her in a cage. Does that mean they’re going to kill her?”

“There is nothing you can do for her now. Try to sleep.”

The loud roar of the engines made sleep nearly impossible, but the strain of the past day had taken its toll. For all of the chains and cages, the transport was warm and Kalpana drifted in and out of consciousness.

Several hours later, Ursa nudged her awake.

An ant-like soldier unlocked their shackles. “You three, follow me.” it chattered.

Ticka translated his words into text and transmitted them to her sublime inter-corneal implants.

Kalpana followed behind Ursa and Tikka, swinging her body between her arms at a quick pace to keep up with their escort. As they moved out of the transport she was blinded by the brilliant glare of the city. Glass, crystal, metal and polished rock covered every surface. Dozens of Ruska moved about the street. They wore fancy head dressings and tail markings. Unlike her Paddy who had much preferred to appear simply as he was, the city dweller’s furs had been dyed in all sorts of colors and patterns.

Kalpana drew in a deep breath, hoping to catch a whiff of something familiar in the air. But the city’s air was thick with the scent of dry, dead flowers. What little plant-life existed within the cold, sterile cityscape was quiet and inert. She missed the trees back home that clapped in the wind. She longed to hear the melodic voices of the flowers as they sang to birds and insects.

“I don’t think I can live here. Everything is so fake,” she whispered to Tikka.

The ant-like escort jabbed Kalpana’s back

“Ow,” she cried out.

Ticka quickly stepped between Kalpana and the soldier.

“Just keep moving,” he urged Kalpana. “I think we might be almost there.”

The escort stopped in front of a large multi-story building that floated on a large, round pond. Kalpana stared at the water. Something was wrong. It did not sparkle in the sunlight. She dipped a finger into the pool and drew them into her mouth. Like everything else in the city, it tasted flat and artificial.

The transporter behind her grunted and shoved her forward grumbling something about the water being only for decoration and not for drinking.

Kalpana chanced a glance at Tikka, and he put up a finger on his lip, urging her to silence. She hand walked close enough to rub against Ticka while walking. Ursa was forced to walk behind, but she could feel its warm breath on her back, so that helped. Only her right side where for years Paddy walked on his six paws, was missing. It was a huge space to fill and reminded her of the fact he was now dead.

The guard pressed a button to summon the freight elevator and then grunted and pointed when the car arrived.

Small piles of rotting food scraps littered the corners of the small space and gave off a rancid odor. Kalpana hid her nose in her sleeve to keep from gagging, ignoring yet another disdainful glance from the soldier.

They traveled up more than a dozen floors before the door opened. The quiet hallway offered only a single door. The family crest emblazoned on the glass surface was familiar. An exact copy hung in the front hall of Paddy’s home.

The soldier knocked loudly and the door opened almost immediately. A bright orange furry face with yellow lips looked out at them. At first, there was the friendly pant of greetings, but as they heavily hooded yellow eyes took in the three of them, the creature let out a low hiss. Slamming the door shut. Ursa, Ticka, and Kalpana stood there in a pocket of worry. When the door opened again, a sadder, older version of Paddy appeared in the doorway and whispered a command that sends the orange faced creature scurrying off to somewhere inside.

The Ruska before them was the spitting image of his brother in looks, his eyes, however, were void of the joy and peace that had made Paddy who he was. The Ruska opened the door and waved them in, then dismissed the escort.

“I have no idea what my brother expected me to do with you, but I suppose we’ll figure it out.”

He sighed, and turned, motioning with his tail for the three of them to follow him further inside.

Beneath Kalpana’s hands, the stone floor was cold and slick. She recognized the stones immediately. They were known as “singing stones” and had been harvest from one of the many strange and wonderful Islands she had traveled to with Paddy. Each stone made created its own unique sound when pinged or gently vibrated. A small singing stone had occupied the center of the main room of Paddy’s home and Kalpana had danced on it many times. Though she could not hear the sounds as others might, she could feel the vibrations of the sound in the air. Sometimes the ocular device would pick up some of the lower tones and she could hear that. They tickled. She paused and gently tapped the corner of one stone, but she felt no vibration. the stones were fitted so tightly together there was no joy in stepping on them to make music. Instead, the stones had been reduced to nothing more than a dull brown slap manufacture and polish Kalpana reached out and touched the wall. They were made of wood, but they didn’t sing as the walls of Paddy’s house had done. The wood around her came from speaking trees, she could just barely detect their woody scent. It was customary to only harvest old trees, those near the end of their lifespan, but the planks that lined the wall had been taken from young trees not yet ready to leave their roots. Among her gifts was the ability to smell emotion. She could smell their anguish and loneliness. Kalpana’s worry had magnified ten fold This place was void of any warmth, of love, of caring. It felt only empty.

“Tikka,” she whispered, “this cannot be our new home. We’ll die here. I want to go home.” she whispered

Tikka shook his head, “We cannot go back.”  he texted to her. Which ran a line of text on her implants in her left eye

The hard reality of her current situation brought tears to her eyes. Such emotion was frowned upon by the Ruska, but she didn’t care. Too much had happened and she had lost too much. How could Paddy send her here?

They followed their new master to the back of the house, through a door into dark, dank space.

“These are the servants’ quarters, your new home. This is the only place you may roam freely. Should your assistance be needed, you will be summoned to the main house.”

In quick order, he pointed out the food receptacle, litter box, and power stations, and the one place they could sleep. Kalpana moved forward and looked up at the Ruska who looked so much like her Paddy.

“Excuse me, sir, what should we call you.”

He raised a hand as if to strike her, but did not follow through.

“You may also not speak to me or any member of this household unless you are spoken to. Is that clear?”

Kalpana nodded and moved back behind Tikka and Ursa. “Stay quiet and we may find a use for you here. Cause problems and I’ll send you to the meat markets without a second thought.” He turned and closed the door behind him.

Kalpana’s tears fell freely.

It had been hours since their arrival, but Kalpana felt no more welcome than she had when they first arrived. The servant area was cold and boring. As they had done many times, when it was too cold or too hot to go outside to play, Ticka and Ursa took turns tossing her up into the air. The sensation of flying and falling always made her laugh.

“Again, again,” she said every time she landed in the middle of her sleeping cot. With every toss, her laughter grew louder and more full.

Heavy steps echoed from down the hall and Paddy’s brother appeared, a thick frown on his face. Kalpana smiled at the Ruska. “Paddy said you were always a great brother. What can I call you?”

The severe furrow of his brow softened and the corners of his mouth turned up in a small smile. His slumped shoulders pressed back a little. He reached out for her hand. His paw was warm and furry like Paddy’s had been.

“That my brother spoke so highly of me, speaks to the caliber of his character. It seems then, little one, that you do not remember me?”

“We’ve met before? When? Where?.” Kalpana said using her best speaking voice which had a nasal quality.

The Ruska smiled. “I was the one who found you and your friend Sandy in the animal hole and took you to my brother. I ferreted the two of you out in my pocket, but neither one of you could be still or quiet for very long, so every time a guard came I would squeak to mask the sound of your crying. “So, please, call me Squeaky. I am so very happy to see you again. I am sorry I spoke so harshly to you. It was necessary to do so for appearances.”

Kalpana hadn’t thought of her time in the animal hole in a long time.

Her life with Paddy had almost erased it from memory.

“What do you think you are doing?” A tall imposing female Ruska screamed at them from the end of the hallway.

“You do not speak! Especially to these, abominations. “ She moved forward and pushed Paddy’s brother away from Kalpana.

“My poor pathetic excuse for a husband only took you in because of family obligations.” Ticka quickly sent a text message telling her what the creature in front of her was saying. Disgust covered her face. “You’re as useless as he is.” She glared at her husband. “It’s bad enough you’re a sterile and incapable of producing eggs, but now you expect me to feed and house these things? We’ll see how long that lasts.” She whirled around and stormed back out into the main house, slamming the door behind her.

Kalpana reached out and took her new master’s hand back into her own. She pulled a blue stone from her pouch and placed it on his palm. A shimmering blue light enveloped his entire body. He dropped to his knees, near tears, his fear evident on his face.

Kalpana spoke softly hoping to soothe him. “Don’t worry, this stone will not hurt you, it only helps me to see the truth of things.” Kalpana closed her eyes and the let the stone’s energy fill her tiny body.

“She lies,” she whispered. “You are not sterile. Your wife took your seeds while you were sleeping and sold them! Go to seed dealer at the back of the marketplace in the square, your seeds are there.”

The vision and the light faded and Kalpana dropped the stone back into her pouch.

Squeaky’s large eyes filled with tears as he hugged her and stroked her cheek.

“I married her because she is royalty. It was all arranged and it was designed to bring honor back to my family. But I fear it has done nothing but destroy everything good we stand for.” He bent and kissed the top of Kalpana’s head. “I always knew you were something special. Thank you.” With one last listless smile, he turned and then walked quietly down the hall.

Ticka and Ursa replied in unison.“As do we.”

A short time later a small parcel fell from a delivery chute that was usually reserved for dirty laundry. It was wrapped in plain brown paper with a hand-written note attached.

Sleep and eat well, my friends. – Squeaky

Inside were several clean blankets and some upgraded rations.

“Maybe it won’t be so bad here after all,” Kalpana wondered aloud as they settled onto their cots to sleep.

Ursa shook his head.

“I agree with Ursa, “ Ticka said as he dusted off a charging port and plugged in for the night. “Squeaky’s wife does not seem trustworthy and she does not have our best interests at heart.”

“Paddy always said we should look for the good in people. Maybe she’s not as bad as she seems? Maybe we can show her how useful we can be?”

Ticka said nothing further, as he tucked her into bed. Wrapped in a clean blanket, Kalpana fell asleep thinking of home and of Paddy.

“Kalpana! Wake up!”

Kalpana’s eyes snapped open at Ticka’s frantic shaking. The pull of exhaustion instantly evaporated as her eyes focused on the shock-prong stick that hovered just inches from her face. Animal gatherers! It was at the hands of such degenerates that she had experienced her first taste of despair. Memories of the darkness of the animal hole, once faded by the love Paddy provided, rushed forward.

Kalpana jumped from the cot and fell prone in front of the orange-faced one. She clasped her hands in front of her, her eyes pleading for mercy. But all she got was a hiss and a kick for her efforts.

Squeaky’s wife stood watching the entire scene. “Take them all. And good riddance.” She pointed at Kalpana. “I don’t know how you found about my mate’s worthless eggs, but know that his disobedience will cost him his life as soon as he is found. He is as good as dead which puts your fate in my hands.” A dark, twisted smile spread across her face. “Good riddance.” The animal gatherers moved in closer, the tips of their prongs glowing with a current.

Ticka rushed across their small area and jumped onto Ursa’s shell.

Pulling out the stone Paddy had given him, Tikka pressed it into Kalpana’s hand as he pulled her up beside him. “Go!”

Kalpana heard a strong voice call out to her. “Come now!”

She reached for the voice as if going through a door.

In a flash, the hallway full of animal gatherers disappeared, replaced by freezing cold and the blinding whiteness of snow. Ticka hopped off Ursa and push Kalpana down closer to Ursa for warmth and safety.

“Ticka, where are we? What’s happening?” She could see nothing but walls of ice. Was it morning or afternoon? She had no idea. “I’m so cold.”

Ursa chirped beneath her and Kalpana snuggled down onto the furry surface of Ursa’s shell, trying to hold onto some fleeting warmth. Within minutes her arms and legs had grown numb from the cold and she could feel her body drifting towards sleep.

“Ticka, Ursa, it’s too cold. I can’t hold on…”

Who Names The Moon. Chapter 2


Chapter 2

Kalpana huddled in a corner of the transport, her hand firmly wrapped around Ticka’s paw.

“Ticka, what’s going to happen to us?”

“We are being sent to the city, to Paddy’s brother. What will happen after that I cannot be sure.”

“What about all the others? You think they got away?”

“Yes, I am sure many were able to escape. The scat cats were effective in getting the message out and releasing many of the animals from their cages. Most I am sure got away, others that could not be sold, others simply destroyed. You must not worry about them now. You must focus on your own survival.”

It was a hard reality, but Tikka was only capable of speaking the truth. Paddy, her beloved Paddy was dead. He’d gone without saying goodbye. She’d managed a kiss on his peaceful furry face before the transport soldiers had dragged them out of their home. Only Paddy’s designation of “semi-intelligent” had saved her from the indignity of being forced into a cage. Even so, she’d been shackled to the ship, unable to take move more than a few feet in any direction. Tikka and Ursa had suffered a similar fate.

Others were not as lucky. Friends from the village had also been corralled into the transport ship. She’d watched as too many familiar faces were designated  as either livestock or meat stock, then locked up like animals for the remainder of the trip.

“I think I saw Sandy. They put her in a cage. Does that mean they’re going to kill her?”

“There is nothing you can do for her now. Try to sleep.”

The loud roar of the engines made sleep nearly impossible, but the strain of the past day had taken its toll. For all of the chains and cages, the transport was warm and Kalpana drifted in and out of consciousness.

Several hours later, Ursa nudged her awake.

An ant-like soldier unlocked their shackles. “You three, follow me.” it chittered.

Ticka translated his words into text and transmitted them to her sublime inter-corneal implants.

Kalpana followed behind Ursa and Tikka, swinging her body between her arms at a quick pace to keep up with their escort. As they moved out of the transport she was blinded by the brilliant glare of the city. Glass, crystal, metal and polished rock covered every surface. Dozens of Ruska moved about the street. They wore fancy head dressings and tail markings. Unlike her Paddy who had much preferred to appear simply as he was, the city dweller’s furs had been dyed in all sorts of colors and patterns.

Kalpana drew in a deep breath, hoping to catch a whiff of something familiar in the air. But the city’s air was thick with the scent of dry, dead flowers. What little plant-life existed within the cold, sterile cityscape was quiet and inert. She missed the trees back home that clapped in the wind. She longed to hear the melodic voices of the flowers as they sang to birds and insects.

“I don’t think I can live here. Everything is so fake,” she whispered to Tikka.

The ant-like escort jabbed Kalpana’s back

“Ow,” she cried out.

Ticka quickly stepped between Kalpana and the soldier.

“Just keep moving,” he urged Kalpana. “I think we might be almost there.”

The escort stopped in front of a large multi-story building that floated on a large, round pond. Kalpana stared at the water. Something was wrong. It did not sparkle in the sunlight. She dipped a finger into the pool and drew them into her mouth. Like everything else in the city, it tasted flat and artificial.

The transporter behind her grunted and shoved her forward grumbling something about the water being only for decoration and not for drinking.

Kalpana chanced a glance at Tikka, and he put up a finger on his lip, urging her to silence. She hand walked close enough to rub against Ticka while walking. Ursa was forced to walk behind, but she could feel its warm breath on her back, so that helped. Only her right side where for years Paddy walked on his six paws, was missing. It was a huge space to fill and reminded her of the fact he was now dead.

The guard pressed a button to summon the freight elevator and then grunted and pointed when the car arrived.

Small piles of rotting food scraps littered the corners of the small space and gave off a rancid odor. Kalpana hid her nose in her sleeve to keep from gagging, ignoring yet another disdainful glance from the soldier.

They traveled up more than a dozen floors before the door opened. The quiet hallway offered only a single door. The family crest emblazoned on the glass surface was familiar. An exact copy hung in the front hall of Paddy’s home.

The soldier knocked loudly and the door opened almost immediately. A bright orange furry face with yellow lips looked out at them. At first, there was the friendly pant of greetings, but as they heavily-hooded yellow eyes took in the three of them, the creature let out a low hiss. Slamming the door shut. Ursa, Ticka, and Kalpana stood there in a pocket of worry. When the door opened again, a sadder, older version of Paddy appeared in the doorway and whispered a command that sends the orange faced creature scurrying off to somewhere inside.

The Ruska before them was the spitting image of his brother in looks, his eyes, however, were void of the joy and peace that had made Paddy who he was. The Ruska opened the door and waved them in, then dismissed the escort.

“I have no idea what my brother expected me to do with you, but I suppose we’ll figure it out.”

He sighed, and turned, motioning with his tail for the three of them to follow him further inside.

Beneath Kalpana’s hands, the stone floor was cold and slick. She recognized the stones immediately. They were known as “singing stones” and had been harvest from one of the many strange and wonderful Islands she had traveled to with Paddy. Each stone made created its own unique sound when pinged or gently vibrated. A small singing stone had occupied the center of the main room of Paddy’s home and Kalpana had danced on it many times. Though she could not hear the sounds as others might, she could feel the vibrations of the sound in the air. Sometimes the ocular device would pick up some of the lower tones and she could hear that. They tickled. She paused and gently tapped the corner of one stone, but she felt no vibration. the stones were fitted so tightly together there was no joy in stepping on them to make music. Instead, the stones had been reduced to nothing more than a dull brown slap manufacture and polish Kalpana reached out and touched the wall. They were made of wood, but they didn’t sing as the walls of Paddy’s house had done. The wood around her came from speaking trees, she could just barely detect their woody scent. It was customary to only harvest old trees, those near the end of their lifespan, but the planks that lined the wall had been taken from young trees not yet ready to leave their roots. Among her gifts was the ability to smell emotion. She could smell their anguish and loneliness. Kalpana’s worry had magnified ten fold This place was void of any warmth, of love, of caring. It felt only empty.

“Tikka,” she whispered, “this cannot be our new home. We’ll die here. I want to go home.” she whispered

Tikka shook his head, “We cannot go back.”  he texted to her. Which ran a line of text on her implants in her left eye

The hard reality of her current situation brought tears to her eyes. Such emotion was frowned upon by the Ruska, but she didn’t care. Too much had happened and she had lost too much. How could Paddy send her here?

They followed their new master to the back of the house, through a door into dark, dank space.

“These are the servants’ quarters, your new home. This is the only place you may roam freely. Should your assistance be needed, you will be summoned to the main house.”

In quick order, he pointed out the food receptacle, litter box, and power stations, and the one place they could sleep. Kalpana moved forward and looked up at the Ruska who looked so much like her Paddy.

“Excuse me, sir, what should we call you.”

He raised a hand as if to strike her, but did not follow through.

“You may also not speak to me or any member of this household unless you are spoken to. Is that clear?”

Kalpana nodded and moved back behind Tikka and Ursa. “Stay quiet and we may find a use for you here. Cause problems and I’ll send you to the meat markets without a second thought.” He turned and closed the door behind him.

Kalpana’s tears fell freely.

It had been hours since their arrival, but Kalpana felt no more welcome than she had when they first arrived. The servant area was cold and boring. As they had done many times, when it was too cold or too hot to go outside to play, Ticka and Ursa took turns tossing her up into the air. The sensation of flying and falling always made her laugh.

“Again, again,” she said every time she landed in the middle of her sleeping cot. With every toss, her laughter grew louder and more full.

Heavy steps echoed from down the hall and Paddy’s brother appeared, a thick frown on his face. Kalpana smiled at the Ruska. “Paddy said you were always a great brother. What can I call you?”

The severe furrow of his brow softened and the corners of his mouth turned up in a small smile. His slumped shoulders pressed back a little. He reached out for her hand. His paw was warm and furry like Paddy’s had been.

“That my brother spoke so highly of me, speaks to the caliber of his character. It seems then, little one, that you do not remember me?”

“We’ve met before? When? Where?.” Kalpana said using her best speaking voice which had a nasal quality.

The Ruska smiled. “I was the one who found you and your friend Sandy in the animal hole and took you to my brother. I ferreted the two of you out in my pocket, but neither one of you could be still or quiet for very long, so every time a guard came I would squeak to mask the sound of your crying. “So, please, call me Squeaky. I am so very happy to see you again. I am sorry I spoke so harshly to you. It was necessary to do so for appearances.”

Kalpana hadn’t thought of her time in the animal hole in a long time.

Her life with Paddy had almost erased it from memory.

“What do you think you are doing?” A tall imposing female Ruska screamed at them from the end of the hallway.

“You do not speak! Especially to these, abominations. “ She moved forward and pushed Paddy’s brother away from Kalpana.

“My poor pathetic excuse for a husband only took you in because of family obligations.” Ticka quickly sent a text message telling her what the creature in front of her was saying. Disgust covered her face. “You’re as useless as he is.” She glared at her husband. “It’s bad enough you’re a sterile and incapable of producing eggs, but now you expect me to feed and house these things? We’ll see how long that lasts.” She whirled around and stormed back out into the main house, slamming the door behind her.

Kalpana reached out and took her new master’s hand back into her own. She pulled a blue stone from her pouch and placed it on his palm. A shimmering blue light enveloped his entire body. He dropped to his knees, near tears, his fear evident on his face.

Kalpana spoke softly hoping to soothe him. “Don’t worry, this stone will not hurt you, it only helps me to see the truth of things.” Kalpana closed her eyes and the let the stone’s energy fill her tiny body.

“She lies,” she whispered. “You are not sterile. Your wife took your seeds while you were sleeping and sold them! Go to seed dealer at the back of the marketplace in the square, your seeds are there.”

The vision and the light faded and Kalpana dropped the stone back into her pouch.

Squeaky’s large eyes filled with tears as he hugged her and stroked her cheek.

“I married her because she is royalty. It was all arranged and it was designed to bring honor back to my family. But I fear it has done nothing but destroy everything good we stand for.” He bent and kissed the top of Kalpana’s head. “I always knew you were something special. Thank you.” With one last listless smile, he turned and then walked quietly down the hall.

Ticka and Ursa replied in unison.“As do we.”

A short time later a small parcel fell from a delivery chute that was usually reserved for dirty laundry. It was wrapped in plain brown paper with a hand-written note attached.

Sleep and eat well, my friends. Squeaky

Inside were several clean blankets and some upgraded rations.

“Maybe it won’t be so bad here after all,” Kalpana wondered aloud as they settled onto their cots to sleep.

Ursa shook his head.

“I agree with Ursa, “ Ticka said as he dusted off a charging port and plugged in for the night. “Squeaky’s wife does not seem trustworthy and she does not have our best interests at heart.”

“Paddy always said we should look for the good in people. Maybe she’s not as bad as she seems? Maybe we can show her how useful we can be?”

Ticka said nothing further, as he tucked her into bed. Wrapped in a clean blanket, Kalpana fell asleep thinking of home and of Paddy.

“Kalpana! Wake up!”

Kalpana’s eyes snapped open at Ticka’s frantic shaking. The pull of exhaustion instantly evaporated as her eyes focused on the shock-prong stick that hovered just inches from her face. Animal gatherers! It was at the hands of such degenerates that she had experienced her first taste of despair. Memories of the darkness of the animal hole, once faded by the love Paddy provided, rushed forward.

Kalpana jumped from the cot and fell prone in front of the orange-faced one. She clasped her hands in front of her, her eyes pleading for mercy. But all she got was a hiss and a kick for her efforts.

Squeaky’s wife stood watching the entire scene. “Take them all. And good riddance.” She pointed at Kalpana. “I don’t know how you found about my mate’s worthless eggs, but know that his disobedience will cost him his life as soon as he is found. He is as good as dead which puts your fate in my hands.” A dark, twisted smile spread across her face. “Good riddance.” The animal gatherers moved in closer, the tips of their prongs glowing with a current.

Ticka rushed across their small area and jumped onto Ursa’s shell.

Pulling out the stone Paddy had given him, Tikka pressed it into Kalpana’s hand as he pulled her up beside him. “Go!”

Kalpana heard a strong voice call out to her. “Come now!”

She reached for the voice as if going through a door.

In a flash, the hallway full of animal gatherers disappeared, replaced by freezing cold and the blinding whiteness of snow. Ticka hopped off Ursa and push Kalpana down closer to Ursa for warmth and safety.

“Ticka, where are we? What’s happening?” She could see nothing but walls of ice. Was it morning or afternoon? She had no idea. “I’m so cold.”

Ursa chirped beneath her and Kalpana snuggled down onto the furry surface of Ursa’s shell, trying to hold onto some fleeting warmth. Within minutes her arms and legs had grown numb from the cold and she could feel her body drifting towards sleep.

“Ticka, Ursa, it’s too cold. I can’t hold on…”

Kalpana awoke to the smells of familiar food. Gone were the snow and biting cold. She lay on a cozy coat, wrapped in warm fleece like blankets. Ursa lay on the floor a short distance away, munching quite happy on fresh grub. She climbed down from the cot and moved over to Ursa. “Where are we? Where’s Ticka?”

Ursa sent a stream of images almost too fast for her to understand. They’d been rescued, but by whom she couldn’t tell. Curious, Kalpana inched away from Ursa and approached a heavy wall hanging that covered an opening in the room’s stone walls.

Outside white ice and sharp mountains stretched as far as the eye could see. Shuffling back toward the center of the room, she scanned the rest of the space. Greatly polished glass globes hung at various heights from the tall, cavernous ceiling. The walls shifted from shades of soft gray to black and brown. Some surfaces were painted with intricate patterns in bright colors The deeper she moved into the cave the stronger the smell of food grew. A thick fur hung over the opening of a large alcove. She could hear movement on the other side and the distinct sound of Ticka’s internal mechanisms as they ran through his regular diagnostic routine.

Kalpana pushed through the furs and smiled. She recognized the group that sat before her immediately. They were the old ones, those given the power of foresight and the memory of their entire species. Their long, slender bodies bore no legs, instead, they moved in a gentle swaying motion from side to side, like the garden snakes that had frequented Paddy’s garden. Each had several sets of long slender arms with hands, not unlike her own, save a shiny black claw that extended from each fingertip.

Half a dozen of them sat in a circle around a golden fire. They all turned to look at her, then one nodded in her direction and held up a small plate of food, inviting her inside with a wave of his other hands. From the smell of it, there was berry paste, lentil sweets, and even some meat. Needing no second invitation, she hurried towards the promise of a meal and settled on the floor next to Ticka.

Kalpana signed her thanks before accepting the plate and taking her first bite. She remembered from her studies with Paddy the customs of these ancient peoples. Their voices were subsonic and too low for most other species to hear, so they had adapted and learned to speak with quiet and calm gestures. When she was done eating, the same one who had given her the food, signed to her.

“We felt your touch upon the mountain. We knew it was the time. Your Paddy, he is gone now?”

Kalpana simply nodded. “And then he sent me to his brother, but we were not as safe there as he had hoped, she signed back.

The heavy furs covering the alcove entrance parted and Ursa trotted into the room and settled next to Kalpana.

The old ones leaned in closer together. Kalpana could not hear their voices, but it was clear they were discussing her situation. After several moments, they returned their attention back to her.

Kalpana, my name is So Tall. We have known of your coming for many years, though we were not expecting you so soon. We have a gift for you. This is a stone from the mountain that sings to the stars. He offered her around red stone hanging from a thin leather string. “It was carved out long, long ago, before the Zebu colonized this planet and brought the Ruska here. I suspect many had forgotten that fact, but your Paddy had not. This stone is yours now. It will sing you to the stars of your new home. Trust in this gift.”

Kalpana reached for the gift, but finding it warm to the touch, hesitated to take it from him.

Will this poison me? Warm stone usually means it can hurt us.”

The old one smiled. “Do not worry,. The warmth comes not from radiation, but because it matches the temperature of whatever environment it is in.”

Intrigued by the stone, Kalpana slipped it around her neck and let it touched her skin. The gentle warmth grew but was not painful. The colors on the surface of the stone began to swirl. Seconds later it began to sink into her skin. Kalpana yelped, drawing Ursa to his feet in alarm.

The old one reached down and lifted the stone easily from her skin with a single claw. A smile stretched across his face. “Be still, little one, you are in no danger. This stone is so special, it hides wherever it is placed.”

 Kalpana took a deep breath, and lifted the stone from his claw, dropping it back down onto her skin. As before, the stone soon disappeared. She pulled at the thin leather cording away from her body and watched as the stone rematerialized.

“Amazing.”

The group of ancient ones muttered in unison, and though she could not hear their laughter Kalpana could feel their joy.

“Forgive me for not warning you about the stone. I am old even for an old one. I am the leader of this tribe. Soon, we will go to the sacred place in the mountain and sing to the stars ourselves, as we fade from this place to the next.”

“Old one, why did you bring me here? Will I go with you to the place?”

“No. You have much left to do, little one. But first, you must wait for the Aim Mee.”

“What is an Aim Mee?” Kalpana frown as she signed the last two words like a tossed stone hitting a wall.

“They are a people like you, with hands and skin like yours. You must go with these people and help them. They will be here soon, but until then, you must not allow yourself to be captured.”

“Can’t we just stay here with you, old one? I miss our home. I miss my Paddy.”

He did not reply to her question but continued with his instructions. “Once you are with these people, you must destroy the snow stone, the white one that brought you here. It will no longer bring you help, only death if you return to this place. We have done our service and it is time for us to leave.”

“I don’t want you to die. First Paddy, and probably Sandy. Please don’t go, old one!”

“There, there little one, we do not die, only fade. One day, you will return here, even without the stone. You will be very old, but when you come you will finally understand. For now, trust us. When in doubt, turn to Ticka for answers for he has the story of our people in his memory banks.”

The old one reached out and petted Ursa.

“Ursa, soon you will return to your own home. Kalpana will take you there. This stone will help.” He pointed to the stone around her neck.

The Old One stood and carefully lifted Ticka in one hand and Kalpana in another before placing them gently on Ursa’s back.

“We will send you to where the Aim Mee will come. You must watch for them. Remember you can trust them and do not be caught by the animal rustlers.”

He smiled down at them, then taking a stone similar the one that had brought Kalpana to them, he placed a hand on each of them. In an instant, Kalpana found herself in the shadow of a dirty city, Ursa, and Ticka at her side.

Who Names The Moon: Chapter One


Moving stiffly, Paddy pushed open the front door. Folding up from six legs to four, he stepped onto the warm stone floor of his small abode. His home was no more than a handful of rooms, but it was his and he cherished it. When his great-grandsire had passed, he had not been the first in line to receive it. But, no one else had wanted its rough-hewn walls and geothermal heating. The rest of his family preferred the city and its gleaming walls of high crystal, glass, and other shiny things. Now that he was dying, he wondered what would become of the place and his menagerie of pets. There was only one brother who might be interested, who had not abandoned their brotherly bond entirely.

The poison had begun its deadly work. He could feel it begin to seep into every muscle. If he was lucky, he had an hour at most. First, he saw a small brown child. She was thirty years older than she looked. Her genetic coding had her stop aging at ten years of age. She was one of the U’ma from the cryogenic cold ships that carried millions of embryonic seeds of all kinds of life forms from Humans or U’ma as the Kulu called them. Other seeds down to the fungus that breaks down dead matter to the prize roses and everything between. These ships were discovered about fifty cycles ago and rather than let them arrived at their chosen worlds, they were picked up and sold on markets for various goods. Both the Kulu of his world and people, and the Nebu insect colony outward; two planets over. In between the two worlds hung like a gleaming award was the Circle. This Circle brought both races to this world, and now it seemed, the war was breaking out to decide who would win. The Insect or the Nebu who were mercenary merchants.

Taking the ships were bad enough, but now, they go to far-flung worlds inhabited by these, humans, and take them and their adaptive skills to make them slaves. Among the Kulu, a small sect had protested and fought for the forging to stop and also to stop altering the life forms. Paddy had been a foremost scientist fighting against these seizures of life ships. Or Cold ships as some were called. Ships got better as they grew their technical skill. Then the news spread, chatter on the lines had spoken of their homeworld being no more. The sun started expanding. Only it expanded too fast. What would have taken thousands of years, blossomed in a matter of short years and no one knew why?

Shuffling over to a small shelf, Paddy smiled at the tiny sleeping being who rested there. She was of a species his kind called U’ma and he had named her Kalpana after one of the early space explorers mention in the history of her race. She was born of medical technology that came both from the embryos stored on the Ice Sleeper Ships and  Irónicas run labs of his own people. They were the overseers of their planet.His people traded for the embryos with minerals needed by the. His own race, the Okra developed the lifeforms into two forms: as they were genetic disposed to be, and as in Kalpana’s case, enhanced.

Her skin was a deep brown like the bark of the Cherie Cheri tree, and she sported a head of dark, curly black hair, save a straight white streak that frequently fell into her face. Born deaf, partially blind and with no legs, as she extraordinary as she was considered defective. The experiment to alter her DNA had gone too far, and the lab that created her deemed her a failure. Instinctively, Paddy had known she was a worthwhile anomaly. His brother had brought her to him. She’d been tossed away with all of the unwanted animals and experiments to the seedy and despicable hole in a hill where those deemed unworthy were forced to fight or be killed.

With his help, her tiny body had learned to adapt. Her immune system grew stronger and she was able to survive on the alien food sources his planet could provide. With her safety and future in mind, Paddy had invested his time and energy into the groundbreaking work of right’s advancement for the growing population of off-world beings. Kalpana had lived with Paddy most of her life, nearly twenty sun cycles, but her early struggles had stunted her growth and development. Her mind and body were still that of a pre-teen child. In fact, he discovered she was deliberately made to have stunted growth and not be allowed to enter puberty. Why he was not able to figure out but found others like her in and around their community. Communications between owners of such children were kept to the minimal. In fact, they were mostly handled through Scat Cats which were very intelligent, but not recognized as such by the general public.  Every day brought new awareness and new triumphs. She had not allowed her impediments to slow her down. She had adapted, learned to walk on her hands as well as sign and she possessed countless other talents, each of which made him marvel at her imperfect perfection. One of the happiest moment of his life had been watching her reaction to the ocular device that had allowed her to see and hear him for the first time. Her hearing was still impaired but improved. Her burgeoning telepathic abilities were remarkable and seemingly limitless.

He gently pulled up her covers, tucking the blankets under her chin. Behind her bed, embedded in the wall was a spiral of stones. They had collected each one on their many adventures. Among her many unusual abilities, the U’ma child could sense the origins of each stone. A simple touch and she would recount descriptions of far-off worlds. In the center of the spiral was a common gray stone, the twin to the stone that hung in a pouch around his neck. This stone was his birthstone, from the nest where he and his many siblings had been hatched. He reached out and trailed a finger over the spiraling stones, pausing briefly on each one, letting his mind drift to the day or special event that had led them to add it to their collection.

From a small cabinet across the room, he retrieved a soft leather pouch that contained a handful of warning stones and a few precious gems. A fresh flood of pain made him double over as the poison snaked further into his system. He could not contain the groan that escaped his lips as he tucked the pouch in his pocket. Efforts to use his mental training for pain control were rapidly failing. He’d seen the effects of this kind of poison before. Soon, his organs would fail and he would be unable to move. There wasn’t much time, but there was still so much to do.

His chest erupted in a fit of deep coughs and the noise drew the attention of a large creature called Ursa who lay on the floor beside Kalpana’s bed. It had a hard, faceted outer shell that often glowed with various colors depending on the creature’s mood.

Sleepy appendages appeared from beneath the shell and waved in the air.

When the coughing passed, Paddy responded to creature’s curiosity was a series of chirps and emotional images. Ursa responded with a wave, acknowledging message received and understood, before settling back to sleep

A familiar voice called out in concern.  “Are you unwell, sir? How can I help you?”

Paddy smiled down at another member of his household. He was designed after a series of pictures, and for in almost all accounts was what Humans/U’ma would call a teddy bear.

“Thank you, Ticka, but there is not much anyone can do.” Paddy had constructed Ticka as a companion for Kalpana, but the creature’s function has become a dual purpose. Hidden beneath Ticka’s furry skin was a barrage of technology, tools, and equipment designed to help Kalpana function in a world that would rather see her destroyed than tolerate her differences.

“Come, Ticka. I have need of your services. Is Kalpana deeply asleep?”

Ticka nodded. “She is in Delta sleep, at last, sir. The nightmares have ceased for tonight.”

“Good. Come, there is much I must share with you, but let us be quiet. I do not wish to wake her.”

“Sir, Her device is always turned off when she sleeps and without it, she cannot hear us.”

“Of course. I thought perhaps because of the nightmares, she would keep it on.”

“Ursa and I convinced her, we would hear everything she needed. She finally relinquished and for that I am glad. Otherwise, her brain stem would not relax enough for full sleep.”

Paddy nodded. “I see. How lucky she is to have you both looking out for her.” He glanced over at Kalpana, then closed his eyes and listened for the sound of her breathing.

“Sir?”

Paddy opened his eyes. A searing heat wound through his guts. Unlike other deadly substances, this particular poison would not provide the luxury of killing him quickly. He would be conscious for every agonizing moment.

“Sir, are you alright? Shall I send for a healer?”

“No, no, Ticka, there is no time. I need you to do a complete overhaul of your systems.” Paddy wrapped two of his many legs around himself in an attempt to ease the pain. “I am adding another twenty exabyte of memory cells, as well as needed hardware to support such a system.”

“Sir, it is illegal for me to carry such things, plus my battery power is not sufficient to run such systems.”

“Yes it is illegal, my friend, but necessary. I managed to purchase a more powerful battery this morning at the market. You will have to do what you can to mask the extra power, and you must be alert of your energy level. The battery will not be strong enough to keep you going for more than a day or two. Daily plugins will be a must. ”

“I will do as you ask, sir, but may I ask why?”

“I am dying, Ticka, I have been poisoned and we must do what must be done to protect the three of you.”

“Three of us?”

“Yes, you, Ursa, and Kalpana”

“The scavengers will pick this place clean, but I am sending the three of you to my brother’s home. There is a provision for retained ownership of semi-intelligence species. They will honor it for the three of you.”

Tikka nodded, and moved toward the computer console, then sat in the seat used for upgrading and immediately powered down. Paddy clicked in a few buttons and connected a wire to Tikka’s power panel. The process was antiquated and took a great deal longer than regular upgrades, but it was safer than voice commands. Hums and clicks informed Paddy the programs were running. The glowing green light of thousands of data streams illuminated the screen and assured him it was the correct one.

With a groan, Paddy curled himself up on a large sitting pillow on the floor. He looked around the room. There were so many who would suffer once he was gone. What few friend he had would be quick to claim the rest of his exotic pets. He only hoped they could find in their hearts to love them as much as he had.

“Paddy, the transformation is complete.”

Ticka’s voice drew him from his worry. “Ah Ticka, that is good. How does it feel?”

“I am 12 kilos heavier. Kalpana will not be able to carry me like she used to.”

“No she won’t, but she will adapt. She always does. Included in your download are specific instruction for a trailer, a wheeled device that will allow her to move quickly on her own. I also need you to release all of our companions, Onno will be able to help many get away. I am assuming he himself will escape to the forest, or so I hope. Try to get as many out as you can, they can seek safe haven with others. However, the war…” Paddy stopped to breathe. “The war, makes many of them looking tempting as a food source rather than a friend in a different skin. Supplies are becoming scarce. Do you see the plans for your survival?”

“Yes, Paddy, I have seen the plans. I will work to complete it as soon as possible. But what of all this other information?”

Paddy ignored his question and pulled the leather pouch from his pocket. “These are the warning stones, carry them for her. There are also a few gems, some worth more than others. But be thrifty, they are all I have to give you. Remind Kalpana of her account with the gold. It is her right since much of the money was made with her skill and yours of doping information to me. It is a small fortune. I have added my brother’s name to it, so sweeten the pot and give the incentive to keep you in good form.”

His body began to lock, his muscles grew still and he labored to breathe. With all of his remaining energy, he removed the stone that hung around his neck and handed it to Tikka.

”This stone is from an Old One. If you find yourselves in danger give the stone to Kalpana., Have her hold it in her hand. It will take you to a safe place. Do you understand?”

“Yes, Paddy, I understand, but what of all this other information, maps and…”

“Oh, Tikka but I am too tired to speak of this now.

Paddy closed his eyes and relinquished the fight for his life. He had done all he could do, given them all, he had to give. With his final thoughts, he imagined a time when they had all be happy together and wished that they could find that kind of happiness again.

And then he was still.

Who Names The Moon – Backstory


Will place chapters here each Friday night throughout October and November 2017 for your reading pleasure. Feel free to comment or email me at dreamstar44@gmail with the subject “Comments”. Thank you.

Who Names The Moon.

A Backstory by N.L.McCormick

She was so tiny and in many ways a perfect little life form. Her ears had been made to not hear, in order, she might hear more of the mind. Her legs shortened to conform more with the master species view of beauty, short form and large well planted feet. Her hands not yet callused from walking would muscle up in time, but for now, she was cradled like so many other babies in the ward.

“Doctor, she is ready to be viewed.” and the Nurse handed her over to the head female of the clan.

“Her nose is a bit pointed, but it is common for her species if she has genes from the Northern climes of her planet. Her hair, however, more from the southern equator. A nice mix. What is this tiny white patch of hair?”

“That is something that is common to the type of deafness she has. We eliminated the possibility of blindness.”

“ Ah yes, in their language, Usher Syndrome.” the doctor tried to pronounce the human language English for it and failed. The nurse knew better than to correct the doctor. She was of the Royal House of the Rainy Plains. The nurse herself was of the lower caste born in the swamps of Dubi.

“Did the other eggs hatch as well as this one?”

“Yes doctor, all the same, healthy results.”

“Good, put them through their anti-puberty injections and have them ready to be released in seven of their growth cycles. They will make fine Pets.”

“Yes doctor.” said the Nurse as she watched the six-legged creature moved out of the room. Large reptilian eyes looked upon the child in her warm-blooded arms.

“I am so sorry little one. Your life will be hard, but you will have a life. May the great circle be yours.” and she flicked a quick tongue over the child in baptism as she did the whole ward.

Then placing the child down as she began injections.

The next dawn, the nurse was removed from the ward, her head gone from her body. Religious actions were not tolerated and she was found out. However, her prayers were heard, and they would follow the children of long ago and now dead, Earth.

Saints and saints a PP presentation.


Saints and saints

All believers in God Almighty and his commandments who have been baptized into the faith, are saints. Remaining a saint requires active participation in your faith (Attending Mass or Church), staying free of at least the major sins (see the ten commandments) and serving in your community and family in some way that embodies your faith. If you do all of this and are willing to die for your faith, you might also make it to becoming a Saint.

That in a nutshell is what separates us saints from the big league. So if you do not become a Saint, do we go to a quasi hell, call purgatory?

  1. First off Purgatory is not hell. As this article states, its is more like the Summer School  of getting to Heaven. Any pain experienced is spiritual, not physical.
  2. It is not because we need punishment, but because we need final healing from our sinful choices we did not let go of before dying. Like that Twinkie you chose to have instead of sticking to a healthy diet. (Been there, done that, forgive me Lord…).
  3. You need to clean yourself of wrong choices from your sinful life. Or you can daily expunge those things and live a prayerful holy life. As always, it is YOUR Choice.

A Saint is someone who is believed to have succeeded in doing this. Shown by Signs and Miracles done after they die, plus possible proven miracles done in their lives before they died. Like a more recent Saint Padre Pio . He suffered greatly and love through God most willingly. For most of us, we live day by day chasing dreams of better living. Saints go day by day chasing ways to make life more holy for others and then themselves.

Start off by donating with out grimace $1.00 plus the number of pennies or change = to days of the month you are in. Donate it daily to something your Church or Parish runs. As you do this, give thanks for what you have and pray for those whom you know are dead. With these baby steps, that do not stop, you will find your path more straight and if you look for it, more signs of grace than you ever seen before. Give it a try for one month and tell about your experience.

 

Book Review of Nick and Tesla.


URL: https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwi8zNP7wfvKAhVEzmMKHVYmCYcQjRwIBw&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.quirkbooks.com%2Fbook%2Fnick-and-teslas-solar-powered-showdown&psig=AFQjCNEdGBgPQ6OkBNBa12ON53Jj4ttwGw&ust=1455685697139549

Title:Solar-Powered Showdown

Series: Nick And Tesla’s

Authors: Bob Pflugfelder and Steve Hockensmith

Genre(s) / Sub-genre(s): YA Mystery and Gadget Making

Published By: Goggle Books

Format(s):Digital  ISBN(s):978-1-59474-866-0

Release Date: May 09, 2016

Rating:  5

Reviewed By: Nancy Louise

© February 15, 2016

The only reason I am giving this a five is for two basic problems. My Kindle view for the iPad was badly formatted and very difficult to read with foot notes being mixed in with the story instead of, well a footnote. Also the story looked like it was in mid-editing with the edited items left rather than removed or changed. I loved the gadget making sections and plan to try the hot dog maker since we are not allowed in our compound to do honest fire based BBQ, this could be an environmental run around.

Now this was the FIRST book I read in the six volumed series. Normally it be perfectly alright, IF it was written to be able to continue a series and as a stand alone. Hey I did it with Nancy Drew books and I worked my way back and forth over the series. In this case, it not working for me. You almost have to read all the other book in order. A well written book can handle the stories being read out of joint. In fact they would cause in you the desire to find the rest of the story without feeling like you have no clue as to who these kids really are. The story had some good strong points though. I loved the science gadget make it help (already said) and I like the quirky personalities they had. My major problem is the pacing and how the book feels really less than half finished. Almost as if they needed a fat outline to get the book approved but never got around to actually writing the whole thing.

Nancy Louise

Space, and there is a LOT of it.


People talk of how approaching seven billion, or already exceeded it in 2011 of the world population. If you are vegan it is estimate about one acer per person. If you prefer the hunter/gather method. More like ten acres per person. So I am going to take a harder science at that and figured that with technology and more micro-climate awareness etc, it should come out to roughly five acres per person. How? Not all plants need to grow on the surface of earth. Multi-level farming is a fairly new method in terms of how much of it is being done on a large scale. Multi-level has been done for centuries in small gardens around the world. But tackling it for large scale populace is a different methodology.  Right now, most of it in the United States is being done around large cities to decrease the amount of time, effort, and packing it takes to get food to the table. The closer you get, the better the food. Fully ripen food is better and more nutrious than partly ripe, under green, and hard like a baseball!

So for a planet that growing in human population (but many of the animals and needed bugs are not as of now, doing as well. Bees anyone?)

Besides the growing of things to eat, we also need room to take care of our waste, make drinking water (we are way past being able to drink from a stream. Even in the Himalayas tip top mountains there are pollutants! So many who believe that the only way to save the earth is not to have children. Well there is a problem with THAT. Most of those who chose not to have children tend to be well educated and are power brokers. Some use the reasoning that there are too many people to begin with. My argument is this, we are adapting. We are tackling the problem of how to live on a heavily populated world. I for one am  optimistic that we will adapt well because we are survivors first. Co-creators is something that also comes naturally to our speices. Rather than being overly worried about our population numbers, I would be more concern about the man-men (and they do tend to be male) who chose a life of crime and terror control of where ever they live. Drug Lords, Mini Kings, and Zealots of the worst kind (I mean that in a multi-national way btw). What is really pushing the space issue is not so much the number of humanity, but how we share. There is a tremendous desire to OWN things first, share when there is only when there is plenty.

Bit by bit some cultures are changing in seeing that sharing is actually more profitable than keeping the best for yourself, in the long run. For example, multi-level farming (This video site DOES have Captions but they are a bit haphazard to read. If anyone knows a better site with similar information, LMK). Can you imagine a skyscraper being turned into a farming that can feed thousands of people? This site talks just about that. There are amazing benefits when used the right way.

Then there is a more argumentative suggestion too. Start Colonizing other planets. It is a natural progression for us. Something that will take a couple hundred years for us to be fluent in how we do this. There will be casualties as well, any actions to work in non-native soil tends to require the acceptance that death is part of the learning curve. That does not argue that we should not do it. Some might find it odd that a Catholic would argue for us to go to the moon and beyond. After all, don’t I believe that Jesus Christ is coming back one day? Would he gather the people on Mars, the Moon, or Jupiter and other places? Yes he will. What we really need to understand, is that we will be carrying home with us. So how can I argue for us to spend so much resources going off planet when we should take care of what we have right now and right here? It is this, going off planet is very much like having children. It is, in my mind, our birthright to explore. The main thing is to take what we have learned here as humans, and apply it as our best selves, out there as well as at home. Space Travel has had a profound impact on our understanding of who and whom we are. It is not a thing to be feared in that in pricing the blackness we will become less. In fact I have every faith we will find more and greater Glory to God than we can perceive right now. If only because we see it from a new window on to life.

Nancy Louise